Looking for something?

Find it in our extensive resource library!

Smart Filters

  • Reset
  • Services

  • Who it's for

  • What it’s about

  • Format

View: 1012

Download: 2

Intussusception reduction in radiology

Summary

Intussusception is a condition where the bowel is folded in on itself. This causes a blockage to the bowel which can cause children to become very unwell.
Intussusceptions are treated in the Radiology Department by filling the bowel with air using special equipment. This is done under x-ray guidance.
If the treatment is unsuccessful in the Radiology Department, the intussusception will need to be treated with a surgical operation.

What is an intussusception?

An intussusception is a blockage of the bowel caused by a child’s gut folding in on itself.

Intussusceptions usually happen in babies and small children. Intussusceptions do not usually have an identifiable cause, although they can sometimes occur if your child’s gut is inflamed or unusually shaped.

Intussusception is a serious medical condition and can make children very unwell. If a doctor suspects your child of having an intussusception, they will usually confirm this diagnosis using an ultrasound scan.

Information:

If you have any questions about the test, please discuss these with the radiologist during the procedure.

How is intussusception treated?

Intussusception is a serious condition because it blocks the bowel.

To relieve the blockage, the bowel must be unfolded. This procedure is called an ‘intussusception reduction’ or ‘insufflation’. It is done by a doctor called a radiologist, in the radiology department.

A surgeon will usually be there during the procedure, and an anaesthetist will be on standby if there are any complications.

How does the procedure work?

The intussusception reduction involves inserting a catheter into your child’s bottom. Air is then passed into your child’s bowel through this tube using a machine called an insufflation device. This air should then unfold the bowel.

While this is happening, the radiologist will be able to monitor your child’s bowel using X-rays.

The procedure usually takes around 20 minutes. Your child should feel much better once the blockage has been reduced.

If the reduction is not successful, the surgeon may decide to try the procedure again after a short while, or your child may have to have the bowel unfolded by a surgeon in an operation.

Are there any risks?

Your child will be exposed to X-rays during the procedure, but we will make sure that the amount of radiation used is as low as possible. This amount of radiation does not have any particular risk and is roughly equivalent to the amount of naturally occurring radiation they would receive over a few months.

There are not usually any side effects from the procedure. Introducing air to your child’s gut will sometimes cause a small tear in the bowel, however this only happens in less than 5 percent of cases.

If your child does have a tear, the leaked air can be relieved by passing a small needle into your child’s tummy near the belly button. When this is the case, your child will then need a surgical operation to repair the hole in their gut.

The risk of a tear happening is nowhere near as large as the risk of leaving the bowel untreated.

Are there any special preparations for the procedure?

A doctor will medically assess your child before the reduction to make sure they are well enough for the procedure.

They will also have an intravenous (IV) cannula put in on the ward before they come down to the Radiology Department.

An intussusception can be very uncomfortable for children, so your child will probably be given some pain relief to help settle them.

Can I accompany my child during the procedure?

1 parent or carer is allowed in the examination room.

A member of staff will ask you to confirm that you are happy to stay in the room and that you are not pregnant. You will be given a protective lead apron to wear to protect against the small amount of X-rays. We advise that pregnant people do not stay in the room during the procedure as there is a small chance that the radiation used could be harmful to an unborn baby.

Does the procedure hurt?

Your child will probably be in discomfort as a result of the blocked bowel. Your child will not be able to feel the X-rays, but there may be some further mild discomfort as the air is introduced to their bowel.

A member of staff will hold your child still during the procedure to make sure they are in the correct position for the X-rays. The discomfort will be relieved as soon as the blockage is removed and the air passed back out.

Can my child eat and drink after the procedure?

After the bowel is unblocked, your child will be taken to a ward where they will be observed closely. The doctor looking after your child will tell you when they can start eating and drinking again.

When will I get the results?

The radiologist will keep you informed during the procedure about how everything is progressing. They will be able to tell you at the end whether the procedure has been successful or not.

Summary

Intussusception is a condition where the bowel is folded in on itself. This causes a blockage to the bowel which can cause children to become very unwell.
Intussusceptions are treated in the Radiology Department by filling the bowel with air using special equipment. This is done under x-ray guidance.
If the treatment is unsuccessful in the Radiology Department, the intussusception will need to be treated with a surgical operation.

Contact us

If you need any help or advice with the information in this resource, you can contact the gastroenterology nurses by telephoning 0114 271 7111 or 0114 271 7162 or by emailing: scn-tr.gastronurses@nhs.net

Is something missing from this resource that you think should be included? Please let us know

Contact us

Disclaimer

Please note: this is a generic information sheet relating to care at Sheffield Children’s NHS FT. These details may not reflect treatment at other hospitals. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professionals’ instructions. If this resource relates to medicines, please read it alongside the medicine manufacturer’s patient information leaflet. If this information has been translated into another language from English, efforts have been made to maintain accuracy, but there may still be some translation errors. If you are unsure about any of the guidance in this resource or have specific questions about how it relates to your child, always ask your healthcare professional for further advice.

How useful did you find this resource?*

Radiology Department

Sheffield Children’s Hospital

Western Bank

S10 2TH

0114 271 7389

Summary

Intussusception is a condition where the bowel is folded in on itself. This causes a blockage to the bowel which can cause children to become very unwell.
Intussusceptions are treated in the Radiology Department by filling the bowel with air using special equipment. This is done under x-ray guidance.
If the treatment is unsuccessful in the Radiology Department, the intussusception will need to be treated with a surgical operation.

NHS

Western Bank
Sheffield
S10 2TH

United Kingdom

Switchboard: 0114 271 7000

Interesting Facts


We’ve got a special MRI scanner just for teddies so children can see what it’s like before they have a scan.

Help to transform our extraordinary hospital into something even better.

@

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close