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Continuous glucose monitoring

What is continuous glucose monitoring?

This is a system where the amount of sugar in somebody’s blood is measured automatically. The monitor checks blood sugar every few minutes and stores the data. This means that the person using it can carry on doing what they would usually do during the day. This way, they do not need to test using a finger prick device lots of times to get the same data.

Your doctor might have asked for this to be done so that they can look at how blood sugar levels rise and fall during the day. This can help them to see if there might be any patterns. They can also see if the person needs to make any changes to their diet, or vitamins and minerals.

What does the glucose monitor look like?

The monitor is made up of two parts. These are called the glucose sensor, and the glucose recorder. The sensor has a very thin tube attached underneath, which is inserted just beneath the skin. The tube is approximately 1.5cm in length.

The outer part of the sensor sits on the skin.

Dexcom G6 Sensor | Dexcom UK Online Store

The recorder is similar to a small mobile phone. This is where the blood sugar levels are recorded and stored. It needs to be kept within 6 feet of the sensor at all times, it is small enough to fit in your pocket.

DEXCOM G6 RECEIVER - Diabetic Outlet

How is the monitor attached?

Your specialist nurse will put the tube of the sensor into the skin of your tummy, or arm.

They will use a small, specially designed needle to guide the tube in, this feels similar to a finger prick device when it is put in place. The device sticks to your tummy with the sticker that is attached. It will not fall off.

Your specialist nurse will then activate the sensor using the recorder, so that it starts to measure your blood sugar levels. It will now automatically measure and record your blood sugar, while you carry on doing whatever you are doing!

Do I have to stay in hospital?

No – once the sensor is attached and has been set up, you can go home.

While at home

For the 7 to 10 days that you are using the sensor, you will only need to monitor your blood sugar levels if the machine alarms. You will be given a patient log to write down everything you eat whilst the monitor is in place.

How will the monitor and sensor be removed?

After 7 to 10 days, the sensor can be taken off.

This can be done by the specialist nurse, or you may be told that you can take it out yourself.

Information:

If you are asked to remove it yourself, you will be told how to do this properly. Taking the sensor out does not hurt.

When the sensor has been taken out, the nurse will then download the data on to their computer. They can then look at this and see exactly what your blood sugar levels have been over the 7 to 10 days.

These results can then be sent to your doctor, or whoever asked for the test to be done. They can give you the results at your next appointment.

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Disclaimer

Please note this is a generic information sheet relating to care at Sheffield Children’s. The details in this resource may not necessarily reflect treatment at other hospitals. This information is not intended as a substitute for professional medical care. Always follow your healthcare professionals’ instructions. If this resource relates to medicines, please read it alongside the medicine manufacturer’s patient information leaflet. If you have specific questions about how this resource relates to your child, please ask your doctor.

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Metabolic Medicine Nursing Team

Email:  scn-tr.sheffieldmetabolicnurses@nhs.net

Telephone:

0114 3053798 (direct) or 0114 271 7000 and ask them to page bleep 236

 

NHS

Western Bank
Sheffield
S10 2TH

United Kingdom

Switchboard: 0114 271 7000

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